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OUR SCHOOLS NEED WELL-TRAINED PARA-EDUCATORS

WITH THE MOVEMENT TOWARD MORE INCLUSIVE CLASSROOMS, OUR SCHOOLS NEED WELL-TRAINED PARA-EDUCATORS!

WALK IN THE CLASSROOM DOOR WITH A CLEAR UNDERSTANDING OF YOUR ROLES AND RESPONSIBILITIES.

THIS 56-HOUR CLASS COVERS THE FOLLOWING TOPICS:
 Roles and Responsibilities
 Mandated Reporter
 PBIS, Special Education
 Stress Management
 NCLB Test Prep
 English Language Learners
 After School Programs
 Attitude in the Workplace
 More!
NEW! Saturday Class
Saturdays, September 7-December 21, 2019
Time: 9 am—1 pm (No class 11/9 & 11/30)
Evening Class:
Tues/Thurs, October 15-December 19, 2019
Time: 6-9 pm (No class 11/26 & 11/28)
Location: EGACE, 8401-B Gerber Rd, Sacramento
Class is FREE!
Materials Fee: $30
EGUSD NCLB test (if required) $15
EGACE also offers a Vocational English-as-a-Second Language class for higher-level English Language Learners that prepares them for the Para-educator Training!
Orientation and registration appointments will be held starting in late July. You can register for an appointment online at www.egusd.net/egace under the Always Learning Online Registration link or call the EGACE front desk at (916) 686-7783.

Click HERE to see the full flyer.

EagleForce Robotics

EagleCourse Robotics
Summer Camps

 EagleForce is hosting summer youth camps to encourage ​STEM, robotics, and teamwork. Using theVexIQ robotics platformstudents get the opportunity to design, build, and program robots while collaborating with each other to complete challenges. At the end of the week, their robots will compete in mini competitions.

Camps are one week sessions, lead by a qualified instructor and several high school camp counselors from the Pleasant Grove EagleForce robotics team.  Two courses will be offered this summer, VEX Beginner and VEX Intermediate. Both courses last 5 days and run from 9:00 AM-3:00 PM. A week of camp costs $250 per child.


​VEX Beginner Camp Dates:
June 3 – June 7
July 15 – July 19

VEX Intermediate Camp Date:
June 10 – June 14


To register, please fill out the form linked here: https://forms.gle/NgzYSa4knFYKm8Mw9
 Feel free to email PGEagleCourse@gmail.com with any questions. 

 

School Accountability Report Card (SARC)

Hello Sunrise families,

The current School Accountability Report Card (SARC) is available online at the Elk Grove Unified School District website at http://www.egusd.net/academics/assessments/school-accountability-report-cards/.  Both a long detailed format and a short executive summary are posted for parents to learn more about the schools in our community.  

The Sunrise Elementary SARC summarizes our mission, goals, accomplishments, and highlights our school’s unique programs.  In addition, state law requires that the SARC contain all of the following: demographic data, school safety and climate for learning information, academic data, school completion rates, class sizes, teacher and staff information, curriculum and instruction descriptions, postsecondary preparation information, fiscal and expenditure data.

The federal law, the Every Student Succeeds Act, requires that SARCs contain reports concerning the “adequate yearly progress” of students in achieving state academic achievement standards; Title I Program Improvement status (not applicable to our school); graduation rates at the secondary level (not applicable to our school); and the extent to which “highly qualified” teachers are teaching core academic subjects.

A hard copy of these reports can be requested by visiting our school office.  Any questions regarding our SARC can be answered by Principal Marty Hock or by contacting Learning Support Services at 916-686-7712.

 

Thank you,

Mary Hock, Principal

EGUSD Incident Reporting System

What is the EGUSD Incident Reporting System and when would I use it?
The EGUSD Incident Reporting System is a newly added reporting tool now available online for students, parents or community members to report incidents. For emergencies and/or urgent situations requiring immediate help, please call 911 or contact EGUSD’s Safety and Security office at (916) 686-7786.

 

How do I access the Incident Reporting System?
The Incident Reporting System can be accessed from anywhere online through a unique link located on every school’s website.

 

Do I need to give my name or other personal information to submit an incident report?
No. You do not need to give your name or identify yourself when you make a report using the online Incident Reporting System. There is an option to identify yourself and leave contact information if you wish to communicate with the Incident Response Team.

 

What types of issues can I report through the online Incident Reporting System?

·         Bullying – Bullying includes verbal, non-verbal, physical or emotional acts against another student either in person, via electronic device or online.

·         Damage or Harm to School or Property – Damage or harm to school property includes intentional destruction to the school or school property in a harmful or malicious manner.

·         Discrimination or Harassment – Discrimination or harassment includes acts against another person on the basis of gender, sexual orientation, race, ethnicity, religion, age, or personal beliefs, either in person, via electronic device or online.

·         Harm to Self or Others – Harm includes intent or desire to injure yourself or others.

 

What happens once I submit an incident report?
Incident reports are received by administration when they are filed, and they are reviewed as soon as possible. All reports are taken seriously and are acted upon in a timely manner. As each incident is different, each will warrant a different reaction and timeline for action. Keep in mind, this process can only be as thorough as the information provided.

 

If I have photos or videos of an incident, can I upload them when submitting a report?
Yes. You may upload photos and include links to video when submitting a report.

Digital Hacks to Make Tech Work Better for Your Family

By

Caroline KnorrCommon Sense Media

Image of blog author

As Common Sense Media’s parenting editor, Caroline helps parents make sense of what’s going on in their kids’ media lives. From games to cell phones to movies and more, if you’re wondering “what’s the right age for…?”…

Using technology to manage your kids’ technology sounds crazy to most parents. Do we really need an app to get kids to stop using their phones? But having a few clever tech tricks up your sleeve can help you solve a range of issues — many of which you didn’t know you had — from paying less for great kids’ TV to minimizing video game violence.

This isn’t only about restricting, banning, or monitoring. Part of managing your kids’ media means arming yourself with information so you can make media and tech work for you — instead of the other way around. It’s also important to realize when tech isn’t the solution at all.

Here are our favorite hacks to improve what your kids watch, see, play, and do.

Make YouTube more kid-friendly. YouTube’s Restricted Mode hides most age-inappropriate videos and also enables safe search in Google. Just go to YouTube. Scroll down to the bottom of the screen. See the little box that says “Restricted Mode: Off”? Click it on.

Tame games. The popular game network Steam offers lots of kid-friendly games such as the LEGO Movie VideogamePortal, and Sid Meier’s Civilization V. But it also sells plenty of games that aren’t appropriate for kids. Use the site’s parental controls, called Steam Family View, to limit what kids can download.

Get high-quality, low-cost kids’ shows without cable. Online streaming video services aren’t only for grown-ups. Hulu Plus, Amazon Instant Video, and Netflix offer high-quality, original kids’ shows. Nutri Ventures (Hulu), Gortimer Gibbon’s Life on Normal Street (Amazon), and Turbo FAST (Netflix) are only a few examples. Some advantages of streaming versus TV: There are fewer commercials, and programs don’t run continuously. Check out great kids’ shows on HuluNetflix Instant, and Amazon Prime.

Help kids focus on one app at a time.

  • In iOS: Let your kids play away on your iPhone, iPad, or iPod Touch without worrying they’ll get distracted by another app — or, worse, get into your email or private files. Apple’s Guided Access feature (found in Settings/General/Accessibility) temporarily restricts your device to a single app.
  • In AndroidThe restricted user profile (for tablets only) lets you create individual environments for each family member, providing access only to the apps (and various features within those apps) you set.

Turn off gore in video games. Sometimes even serious gamers like a little less blood, gore, and violence. A handful of popular titles, including Call of Duty: Black Ops 2Left for Dead 2Assassin’s CreedStarcraft II: Wings of Liberty, and Team Fortress 2, allows players to tone down or turn off the gory stuff. Check your kids’ games to see if this feature is offered.

Be present (and still get work done). Need to cut out of work early for a soccer game or music recital? Got a sick kid on your biggest deadline day? Designate VIPs in your email or phone contacts lists, and you won’t be disturbed until they — and only they — contact you. In iOS you can create a VIP setting that notifies you of important emails.

Get serious about passwords. Kids are accumulating more and more passwords for school, services, social sites, and even their devices — and it’s easy to forget, misplace, or share them by accident. But with increasing large-scale data attacks targeting log-in information, it’s vital to protect the confidentiality and security of your information. Password managers not only generate passwords and keep them secure, they can help reinforce the importance of safeguarding your private information. A few to try: LastPass1Password, and KeePass.

Help your kid manage screen time. Kids don’t necessarily have a built-in off switch. But learning when enough is enough is an essential digital-age skill. Software timers such as Timers4Me and Time Timer count down the minutes you’ve set, allowing kids to take responsibility for managing their own screen time. They work for other tasks, too, such as practicing piano or getting ready to leave the house in the morning.

Get kids reading — for free. Kids are reading less than ever. Reverse that disheartening trend with free digital books, available for your computer or mobile device. In addition to local libraries, which use services such as OverDrive to let you check out free ebooks, a few websites offer free ebooks, including Project Gutenberg, the Open LibraryBarnes & Noble(for use with the free Nook app), and Amazon (for use with the free Kindle app). Start With a Book offers themed lists that include book suggestions and activities.

Shore up your privacy. Did you know that you’re collecting cookies? These data trackers are deposited on your computer by websites and follow you around online, enabling sites to recognize you — but potentially invading your privacy. Sites don’t always make it clear when and how they use cookies, and the data they collect aids marketers more than it does you. Plus, they may be tracking more than you really want anyone to know. Deleting your browser history won’t get rid of them. Here’s how to fine-tune the privacy settings on the most popular browsers: ChromeSafari, and Internet Explorer.

Find your phone — and, while you’re at it, your kid. The free Find my Phone app for iOS or Android is a no-brainer to locate a lost device. But it also can help you check up on your kid, so long as he or she is attached to the phone. Installing the app and enabling the phone’s location services displays the phone (and, presumably, its handler) on a map.

Master your home network. The Internet security company OpenDNS offers a download called Family Shield that lets you set up parental controls on your home network. The service is free, but you have to make a change to your wireless router (it’s daunting but worth it, and the directions talk you through it.)  This filtering service is nearly impossible for kids to defeat.

DIY parental controls. Add content filters to your browser to restrict what kids can search for and more.

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