Internet/Web Filtering/Parental Controls

Every computer in the Elk Grove Unified School District uses an internet/web filtering system. The school district has adopted Phantom Technologies iBoss SWG technology as our filtering solution. The purpose of this solution is to block student and staff access to content deemed inappropriate for K-12 students.

If you are looking for an “at home” internet filtering solution, you can do an internet search for the term “parental web filtering software” to find available options. New software is introduced frequently in response to parents’ wants and needs and in some cases, your ISP (Internet Service Provider) offers built in features to their service.

One of the most popular fee based filtering solutions is Net Nanny. K-9 Web Protection by Blue Coat is often recommended as a good “free” solution.

Why the Best Parental Control is You – Common Sense Media (April 11, 2018)

Cell Phone Parental Controls

Parental controls for cell phones fall into three distinct categories:

  • Content filters – These allow parents to set filters for what multimedia content their children can download to their phones. While content filters are more important for smartphones with full web access and video download capability, most cell phones now have some kind of browser. However, parents should be aware that content filters are not foolproof and inappropriate content can also be received via text, IM or email.
  • Usage controls – Usage controls put the parent in charge of a child’s cell phone usage, regulating the number of calls and text messages. They can also block certain numbers or restrict outgoing calls to a pre-approved list, and even disable the phone during certain times of day, like school hours or after 9 pm.
  • Location and monitoring controls – These can be used to monitor a child’s whereabouts through built-in GPS systems. Some systems can even send alerts when a child’s cell phone moves out of a pre-agreed zone or range.

You can always contact your cell phone provider or visit their website for specific parental control features and information about their services.

Cell Phone Parenting – Common Sense Media
Getting a cell phone has become a milestone for most kids. Common Sense helps parents lay the groundwork for responsible cell phone use and manage the challenges and opportunities they bring.

What Apple’s New iOS 12 Parental Controls Mean for You – Common Sense Media (September 5, 2018)

Everything You Need to Know About Parental Controls – Common Sense Media | Ver en español

Game System/Website Parental Control Resource Links

Xbox 360 and Xbox Live Parent Controls
Xbox One Family – Security, Privacy and Parental Controls
Nintendo Wii Parents – Setting Parental Controls
Nintendo Wii U Parents – Setting Parental Controls
Nintendo DS Browser Content Filtering
Nintendo 3DS Parental Controls Overview
Nintendo Switch Parental Controls Free App
PS4 – Playstation 4 – Parental Controls
PS3 – Playstation 3 – Parental Controls
PS Vita – Parental Controls
iOS – Understanding Parental Controls for iPad, iPhone, iPod touch
Apple Families – Launched in March 2018
iTunes: Using Parental Controls
Webkinz for Parents – FAQ’s
Disney – Club Penguin Parent Guide

Additional Gaming Resources

Many online games have communication features which allow their users to interact anonymously with other players. Some people may take advantage of this anonymity to target children.
Netsmartz Gaming (Parent tips, discussion starters and online gaming benefits and risks)
Video – Netsmartz Gaming – Teens Talk Back
Microsoft Online Gaming – Help Kids Play it Safe
Childnet Parent Guide – Online Gaming – An Introduction for Parents
Common Sense Media Game Reviews (Comprehensive reviews and ratings of popular games)
Stop. Think. Connect – Online Gaming Resources/Tips for Parents

Parent Tips for Online Gaming – (Source: Childnet.com)

  • It may seem daunting, but one of the best things parents can do is to engage with the gaming environment and begin to understand what makes it is so attractive to children as well as the types of activities that they enjoy.
  • Talk with your child/children about the types of game(s) they are playing. Are they role-playing games, sports games, strategy games or first person shooters? If you’re not sure what they are, ask them to show you how they play and have a go yourself.
  • Some games may offer children the chance to chat with other players by voice and text. Ask your children who they are playing with and find out if they are talking to other players. If chat is available, look at the type of language that is used by other players.
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