EGUSD Digital Citizenship

Resources for 21st Century Teaching and Learning

EGUSD Digital Citizenship

Archives for Upstanders

EGUSD Educators #DigCitCommit for #DigCitWeek

Educators throughout Elk Grove Unified guided and supported students through numerous #DigCitWeek activities. Some of the activities represent projects that students will continue their involvement in throughout the school year, while other activities were specifically inspired by the October 15-19 Digital Citizenship Week timeframe.

As you can see from the samples below, elementary, middle and high school students and staff celebrated this national event.

Harriet Eddy Students attend SF Google Headquarters

Harriet Eddy and Katherine Albiani Middle Schools – #ICANHELP

At many of our middle schools, students have attended or will be attending, #ICANHELP rallies. #ICANHELP is a national organization dedicated to helping tweens and teens use social media for good. At Harriet Eddy MS, a team of students recently traveled to San Francisco Google Headquarters to participate in a day where “world changers, transformation seekers, and positivity makers” met to celebrate student voice and digital leadership. #digital4good

“During my time at the #digital4good workshop, I learned many new things and was inspired in different ways.  I learned that it’s extremely important to be smart and have a positive presence online… During our gathering I thought to myself on how I could bring the positivity kids have brought to their schools, to mine. One example I thought about was sticky noting teachers cars and doors with positive things along with starting a club at our school to overall just spread #digital4good.  This workshop also inspired me to bring good to my school because when I saw all the amazing things kids have done to create a better environment, I believed that if they did what I never imagined possible,  I must be able to do it too.  Overall the gathering for #digital4good was an amazing experience and showed me many different stories.” – Beck, 8th Grade – HEMS


Roy Herburger and Sierra Enterprise Elementary SchoolsStand Up Speak Out! Against Bullying Youth Rally

We had the opportunity to attend this past Wednesday’s 6th Annual Stand Up Speak Out! Against Bullying Youth Rally at the California Museum’s Unity Center with students from Roy Herburger and Sierra Enterprise Elementary Schools.

The Unity Center is a dedicated space for celebrating California’s “diverse people, customs and cultures.” The annual rally has been a long-time priority for Sacramento Mayor Darrell Steinberg. His coalition brings together Sacramento school districts to educate students on the importance of taking a stand against bullying/cyberbullying and all forms of intolerance.

EGUSD Students line up to get into the CA Museum Unity Center

Students are greeted by Museum docents as they enter the Unity Center. 

Through the center’s interactive media exhibits, advocacy tools and educational programs, visitors are empowered to be Unity Activists, exercising their rights and standing up for the rights of others.

Sierra Enterprise Students at the CA Museum Unity Center

Stand Up Speak Out! Against Bullying Youth Rally

Students from Sierra Enterprise Elementary shared their takeaways from the day…

“It doesn’t matter whether you are black, white, Asian, Arab, Hispanic, gay, straight, bi, Christian, atheist, Muslim, Jewish, skinny, fat, tall, short, male, female, where you live, who you live with, what you like to do, or anything in between – I don’t care, as long as you’re a good person, we’ll get along just fine.”  – Miricah, 6th Grade

“The most important thing I learned was that anyone and everyone can make a difference.” – Teresa, 6th Grade

“I learned how important it is to stand up and speak out against bullying. Be kind and treat each other with respect.” – Faith, 6th Grade

“Being there made me think that I’m lucky to be in the school I’m in because in my school they teach all of us how to be kind. I’m glad my school is bullying free.” – Karol, 6th Grade


Markofer Elementary Mustang News – Video Creation

We’ve long recognized that the most powerful teaching method is students teaching students, especially around issues of bullying/cyberbullying. The 6th Grade Morning News Team at Markofer Elementary have stepped up, focusing on digital citizenship themes, to produce a set of videos available to their classmates and beyond via their YouTube channel. Although Markofer teacher Tammy Null is a master at making the best of what equipment she has gathered, her in-classroom studio was given a needed upgrade this year with a SEVA grant through SECC – Our local Sacramento Educational Cable Consortium.

One of the topics Markofer students addressed for #DigCitWeek was the importance of building a positive digital footprint.


Joseph Kerr Middle School – #DigCitWeek Daily Discussion/Action Starters and Video Creation
Joseph Kerr Middle School students participated in daily discussions based on digital/global topics provided by Activities Director Chris Perris.

  • Monday – The Power of a Positive Post: Take a minute to tell us why #JKMSRocks
  • Trustworthy Tuesday: Take some time and do legitimate research online on something that interests you or one of your friends. Use a reliable news source and tell someone about it.

Fake News

  • World Wide Wednesday:  Learn about a problem going on in the world currently and think of ways you could contribute to ending it and if possible put that idea into action.
  • Think It Over Thursday: Take only 5 minutes out of your day and learn about some of the positives and negatives of social media to help keep you out of trouble.
  • Fab Friday: Leave one of your friends a message telling them how good of a person they are and what they mean to you.

JKMS Leadership students, under Chris’s supervision, took things one step further. They decided to take on rumors and fake news as a topic for their upcoming short film. Below is a behind the scenes photo – we will be posting a link once their editing is completed.

JKMS Leadership Students


Herman Leimbach Elementary – VoiceThread
The Make Your Mark VoiceThread is from a group of 2nd graders, who reflected on the Peter H. Reynolds’ award-winning story The Dot by creating their own Dot stories, using Google Slides as their drafting board and then importing the slides into a VoiceThread – and in the process, began building a positive digital footprint for their ePortfolios. The students also put into practice, with no prompting from Computer Resource Teacher (CRT) Cathe Petuya, how to respectfully comment and add to an online conversation.


Maeola Beitzel and Irene B. West Computer Labs – Student Activities
CRT Ken Lagomarsino taught Betizel students grade-level appropriate “Quick-Start Activities” from Common Sense, providing every student the opportunity to earn – and proudly display – their  “Digital Passport and Digital Compass” badges.

Fourth grade students at Irene B. West had the opportunity to participate in Google’s Interland Challenge during CRT Uyen Villa’s computer lab sessions.  

Every student in grades 3-6 explored the four interactive worlds in Interland and earned their certificates, proving themselves to Be Internet Awesome Each land focuses on a fundamental skill that is key to becoming good digital citizens.

  • Kind Kingdom – It’s Cool to Be Kind
  • Reality River – Don’t Fall for Fake
  • Mindful Mountain – Share with Care
  • Tower of Treasure – Secure Your Secrets

Uyen’s students shared a few thoughts about what they learned in the Interland Challenge.

“In Interland, I learned to be kind to everyone and help make the internet a better place by reporting bullying or teasing.  I also learned to stay safe online by not telling private information to strangers and to watch out for scams, fake messages, and other suspicious looking games and websites online.”  – Leiann May, 4th Grade

“I have learned it’s important to have a strong password. The Kind Land also taught me it’s important to be kind and not a bully.”– Bao, 4th Grade


Monterey Trail High School – Media Literacy
Media literacy was the focus over at MTHS for #DigCitWeek, with librarian Karin Ledford leading the charge. Each day of the week, she provided teachers with links to lessons and resources by sending out a daily template with a media literacy Word/Phrase of the Day, an Article of the Day, a Video of the Day, a Fake Website of the Day and a Fake News Story of the Day for teachers to pull from to use in their classrooms.

Media Literacy at MTHS Google Doc


Las Flores – Staff Training/Copyright
An email from teacher Joan Siddens reminded us that it’s not just students who need to be aware of digital citizenship issues and resources. Teachers also need training. With fake news being front and center, and cyberbullying on the rise, we all need to be teaching and practicing good digital citizenship. Joan reached out to us for permission to pull some content from our copyright/fair use and media literacy resources to use in her presentation for an upcoming staff meeting.

Las Flores Staff Training on Copyright


We at Elk Grove Unified celebrated another successful Digital Citizenship Week. We were happy to share (boast about) good things happening at our schools during a recent national webinar sponsored by EdWeb, Common Sense and ISTE that we participated in as presenters. As we shared specific examples of #DigCit in action, people from all over the world joined in the chatroom, leaving very positive comments and praising our teachers for the work they do. Participating in the Stand Up Speak Out! Against Bullying Youth Rally was the high point of #DigCitWeek for us and reinforced our #DigCitCommit for the 2018-19 school year.

PBS: We’ll Meet Again – Reiko Nagumo Reunited With Her Upstander

Thanks to an email from Julie Thomas, Library Archivist for California State University, Sacramento, we made sure to be home last Tuesday by 8:00 p.m.

Julie’s subject line was a grabber for us: Reiko Nagumo “We’ll Meet Again.” Her message was short:

“Here is the link to the We’ll Meet Again website and Reiko’s story is highlighted further down the page. I encourage you to tune in at 8:00 (EST and PST) and 7:00 (CST) on your local PBS station. It’s an amazing story about an amazing woman.”

We'll Meet Again TV Show Promo Graphic

We’ll Meet Again is a new PBS series produced and hosted by veteran journalist Ann Curry. The six-part series documents reunions between people whose lives were suddenly disrupted by historic events such as war. Episode 1 features Reiko Nagumo and her childhood friend Mary Frances, who, following the bombing of Pearl Harbor, became and upstander for Reiko.

As part of our EGUSD Time of Remembrance oral histories project, we had the privilege of interviewing Reiko 12 years ago. Her interview is one we often share with elementary students. We especially want them to know about Reiko’s friendship with Mary Frances (clip 2, 04:52). It’s a beautiful example of what can happen when a single person takes on the “upstander role” by crossing the line (or playground) to extend a simple act of kindness to someone in need.

The high quality of our interviews is the result of our continued partnership with the Sacramento Educational Cable Consortium (SECC). We are incredibly grateful to the talent and project dedication of SECC videographer Doug Niva.

Several years ago, following a 3-day trip to the Manzanar internment camp, Doug suggested that we make a short documentary to introduce people to our growing collection of oral history interviews. I’m American Too – A Story from Behind the Fences (16 minutes) includes snippets of Reiko’s interview, along with other internees, whose lives were also overnight and forever changed by Executive Order 9066.

Today, our Time of Remembrance project also includes a Vietnam War section, in which we’ve attempted to capture a little known story: the Secret War in Laos. For a quick overview, watch our 4-minute introduction:

Based on the impact of Reiko’s interview, and in every interview since hers, we always end with the same question: Can you think back to a time in your life (facing exclusion and forced removal, surviving in internment and refugee camps, starting the first day of school in a new country, etc.) when there was someone who stood up for you, making whatever challenges you were dealing with a little easier to cope with?

We are firm believers in the power of a single upstander to make a profound difference in someone’s life – or even change the course of history – and that “it is small things that allow bigger things to happen” (Sam Edleman, Holocaust historian).

The last few months have been painful in our district and city due to a number of hateful, racist incidents, which have been widely publicized through local and national media. To ignite classroom conversations on the exponential negative impact of bystanders, be it face-to-face or online, we invite students across the district, nation, and globe to contribute to our Upstanders, Not Bystanders VoiceThread. We started this VoiceThread a few years ago, and have had an amazing range of contributors, from kindergarten students to humanitarian Carl Wilkens. And, yes, Reiko Nagumo has already shared on our Voice Thread.

Note: A VoiceThread is like a visual podcast. Once you register with VoiceThread for a free account (a process that takes only a couple of minutes), you will be able to post a comment via voice, text, or webcam. Your comment will go “live” as soon as we approve it. If you are in a school district, like ours, that is a GSuite (formerly known as Google Apps for Education) district, you already have an account, as VoiceThread is now integrated into your district Google account. Head to your Google Apps launcher (waffle) and scroll down to the More section to find the VoiceThread icon.

We look forward to hearing your students’ upstander stories – and yours too! Besides the VoiceThread, you can also leave a comment on this post. We’d love to showcase any projects or programs you are implementing in your schools to promote tolerance, respect, empathy, inclusion and global citizenship. If you need lessons or resources to begin conversations on the role of the bystander vs. upstander, Common Sense Education is a great starting point.

In the Classroom: Lessons/Resources
Be Internet Awesome – Itʼs Cool to Be Kind: How can I be an upstander? (Primary Grades) – Google | iKeepSafe curriculum – scroll to page 39.
Be an Upstander (Primary Grades) – Video by the NED show, gives four tips that help kids go from bystander to upstander. 
Hero in the Hallway (Elementary) – Video created by a team of high school and college students to empower younger students to take a stand against bullying and exclusion.
Cyberbullying: Be Upstanding (Grades 6-8) – Common Sense Education (must create or have account to download the lesson PDF)
Cyberbullying: Crossing the Line (Grades 6-8) – Common Sense Education (must create or have account to download the lesson PDF)
Breaking Down Hate Speech (Grades 9-12) – Common Sense Education (must create or have account to download the lesson PDF)
Who is an Upstander (Grades 8-12) – Video created by Facing History and Ourselves

“Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world. Indeed, it’s the only thing that ever has.” ~ Margaret Mead

“The world is a dangerous place to live; not because of the people who are evil, but because of the people who don’t do anything about it.” ~ Albert Einstein

 

EGUSD Students Stand Up and Speak Out Against Bullying

Students from several of our EGUSD schools (Monterey Trail High School and Roy Herburger Elementary School) took the pledge to “Stand Up Speak Out” against bullying at the California Museum’s Unity Center as part of October’s National Bullying Prevention Month and Digital Citizenship Week celebrations.

Stand Up Speak Out Youth Rally - CA Museum - Unity Center

“The Unity Center at the California Museum celebrates the state’s diverse people, customs and cultures. Initiated in 1999 in response to a series of Northern California hate crimes, the Center’s interactive multimedia exhibits highlight leaders in the state’s rich civil rights history and encourage visitors to find common ground while embracing their own individuality.”

Stand Up Speak Out Against Bullying Event - CA Museum - Unity Center

We reached out to the 6th grade team of teachers at Roy Herburger to get their thoughts on the Rally and invited them to share some of their students takeaway messages from the event.

Mrs. Katsandres and her 6th grade class:

“The Stand-Up, Speak Out rally resonated with my students. They were touched by the stories they heard, enjoyed touring the Unity exhibit, and spending time with people that encouraged them to be who they are.” -Mrs. Katsandres

“I appreciated the presenters for telling us about their troubles with bullying. It is a very brave thing to do. I hope and believe that what they do will stop bullying in all ways. Cyber-bullying, publicly bullying and all different types of bullying will stop!” -Genevieve

“I thought that it was a very fun and educational field trip. I learned that you should still be yourself even if you are bullied. From hearing stories about those who were bullied, it inspired me to stand up to bullying. Overall, this field trip was very fun and very inspiring.” -Vy

“It was a very nice experience to hear other people’s thoughts about bullying and how we can prevent it from happening. I liked having a group of people stand up against bullying. I also liked how it taught others to stand up against bullying too! Participating in the anti-bullying rally was fun and I hope others stand up against bullying too.” -Angela

“I enjoyed taking a tour of the Unity room and also enjoyed the presentations.” -Marco

“I love this event because I know that bullying affects many lives and this helps stop it. I also like how other people shared their stories of bullying. If anyone at the rally has been bullied, they would know how to get through it.” -Stuart

“The anti-bullying rally was a really good field trip! I enjoyed listening to other people’s stories of being bullied. I recommend people go to the Stand-Up, Speak Out rally field trip.” -Kyle

Ms. Callaway’s 6th grade class:

“I feel that the field trip was an amazing experience.  I felt like the speeches people gave about how bullying affected their lives were very inspirational and was able to spread positivity to the audience.” -Jesse

“I absolutely love this event.  I was so thankful to attend.  I have been bullied before and right now some of my best friends are really hurting from bullying and depression, so I was very glad to also get things for them.  Thank you again.” -Anatolia

“The rally was very interesting overall.  Everyone seemed supportive and I grew more confident to express myself.  When someone teased my friend, I was able to stand up for her and stop the bully.” -Mary

Ms. Topete and Ms. Berry’s 6th graders:

“I thought it was very good because it showed me that people stand up against bullying and help the people who are being bullied.” -Gabriel

“ What I really enjoyed about the Bullying Rally is how many things are there for you to get help from.” -Seerat

“What I liked about the event is how we got to listen to other people’s stories.” -Mikayla

“I was inspired to help stop bullying. Thanks for inspiring others in my school. I loved it.” -Bekha


Students explore the new 4,000 square foot gallery celebrating California’s diverse people, customs and cultures.

CA Museum Unity Center - EGUSD Students

The Unity Center features interactive exhibits and engaging educational programs exploring California’s rich civil rights history.

Stand Up Speak Out Youth Rally Against Bullying - CA Museum - Unity Center

Students participate in an exhibit encouraging visitors to take an active stance against hate, intolerance and bullying.

We had the pleasure of joining Marielle Tsukamoto for the event. Marielle has been a huge part of our EGUSD Time of Remembrance Project. We invite educators across the globe to share the interviews and resources posted to the Time of Remembrance website with their students. It is our hope that through the living voices of survivors and witnesses of World War II and the Vietnam War, students will gain an understanding of the common threads that connect the exclusion and forced removal of any group of people – and the importance of standing up and speaking out for the rights of all citizens.

EGUSD students attending Stand Up Speak Out Against Bullying event at CA Museum - Unity Center

During Marielle’s interview, she shares her perspective on the impact of the internment years on her family and the Florin community during and following the war years – along with memories of “unsung heroes.”

“Having the Stand Up Speak Out Against Bullying Rally hosted by the CA Museum – Unity Center was especially inspiring for me,” said Marielle. “Empowering youth to speak out against the bullying of any group is truly a way to bring about positive change in any and all communities.”

We look forward to following up on the impact of this year’s Rally with the students who attended. This is our 5th year attending the Stand Up Speak Out Again Bullying Rally and every year is memorable and a call to action.

CA Museum Unity Center - Herburger Elementary School students

#AddUpstander to the Dictionary!

A shout out to The Bully Project for recognizing the need to address the role of the bystander and the importance of promoting upstanders. We agree with their position that although “Bullying Prevention Month might be over… the fight to raise awareness around bullying continues.

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Image Source: #AddUpstander – Change.org

Throughout history, in current events, and across playgrounds, when a bystander finds the courage to stand up and speak out for themselves and/or for others, change happens. Being an upstander can be as simple as standing next to a person that is being bullied, refusing to forward a mean-spirited text message or photo, or having the courage to directly confront a bully.

Upstanders can have a huge impact. According to #AddUpstander – Change.org, “Research shows that over 50% of the time, when an upstander intervenes, a bullying situation is stopped in less than 10 seconds. So, imagine how many more upstanders, and how much less bullying there could be if the word was in the dictionary!”

We agree that it is high time Merriam Webster and Oxford English Dictionary add “upstander.” Given that “bystander” has been a recognized word for decades, “upstander” needs to be formally recognized as a word:

Upstander n.  A person who chooses to take positive action in situations where individuals are being harmed or in the face of injustice in society.”

upstander

Please join the movement and spread the word to #AddUpstander to the dictionary. We look forward to the day when our spellchecker will no longer put the squiggly red line under “upstander.”

As always, if you have upstander stories to share, please leave them via commenting. We especially welcome stories of students as upstanders. Those are the stories we love to see featured on the Upstanders Not Bystanders VoiceThread.

Upstanders, not Bystanders

Last week we posted resources to get you thinking about National Bullying Prevention Month and Digital Citizenship Week. This week we invite you to delve deeper into bullying issues and begin exploring the difference a single person can make by crossing the line from bystander to upstander. From historic events, to current events, to everyday events, do you know someone who found the courage to stand up and speak out for others? If so, we invite you to share their stories on the Upstanders, not Bystanders VoiceThread (see below). How did they make a difference in your life, in the community, or in the world?

Note: Once you register with VoiceThread for a free account (a process that takes only a couple of minutes), you will be able to post a comment via voice, text, or webcam. Your comment will go “live” as soon as we approve it.  We’ve included separate slides for elementary, middle, and high school students, plus adults (1st slide), but everyone is welcome to respond to others’ comments across grade levels and generations.

For a full-size version of this VoiceThread, click here.

To jump start classroom and at-home conversations on what it means to be an upstander, Edutopia has posted a Five-Minute Film Festival: Turning Bystanders Into Upstanders Against Bullying. The opening film is Bystander Revolution | What Can One Person Do To Help?, a mixture of celebrities and regular kids:

If you have upstander resources to share, please leave a comment.

No Place for Hate – HEMS

Try to imagine our excitement when the following message from the Anti-Defamation League (ADL) came into our email:

No Place for Hate progress continues!  Two new schools have joined the Initiative:  Stuart Hall High School in San Francisco and Harriet Eddy Middle School in Elk Grove (Sacramento Area):

A special story about Harriet Eddy Middle School:  This partnership came to us thanks to the enthusiasm and initiative of a 7th grade student who had just moved to Sacramento.  Last year, his school in St. Louis, MO was a No Place for Hate school and his experience was so positive, that he wanted to make sure it continued in his new school!  Staff and Administrators were pleased to support his desire to create a No Place for Hate club!”

Although our EGUSD schools frequently make regional news for good things happening in public education, it’s not every day that a district school and student are showcased by a national organization. So, of course, we contacted HEMS principal Mark Benson for the details: “We’re very impressed by the commitment of Miche, a 7th grader, to bring the No Place for Hate program to Harriet Eddy as a lunch-time and after-school club. NPFH is empowering a growing group of HEMS students to confront and challenge all forms of bullying. The program also complements PBIS.”

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On February 27, it was our pleasure to spend the morning with Mische, Club President, and his fellow NPFH club members for a special event: Becoming an Ally. As a NPFH school, HEMS was eligible for an ADL-sponsored workshop. Thanks to HEMS staff support, the students were able to join ADL Education Coordinator Melia Dunn in the school library for a full day of highly interactive discussions. “Being able to come together for an extended time allowed the students the opportunity to examine the many forms of intolerance and exclusion that are  often part of the middle school culture and to brainstorm ways to promote acceptance and battle against ignorance and prejudice within their own community,” said NPFH club sponsor Jasmine Wayne.

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Melia Dunn, ADL’s Education Director and facilitator for the HEMS event, emailed us the following day:

“My co-facilitator and I were just so impressed with how well the students focused on activities and shared personal experiences. The No Place for Hate club at HEMS is certainly a unique group that should be honored and celebrated as they continue to be part of the change toward No Place for Hate!”

We’ll be inviting Mische and his club members to join us as guest bloggers in order to provide you with more details and insights into HEMS’s No Place for Hate club. In the meantime, we hope the photos from the Becoming an Ally event will give you an idea of what an amazing event and amazing group of students we are showcasing.

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