EGUSD Digital Citizenship

Resources for 21st Century Teaching and Learning

EGUSD Digital Citizenship

Archives for Creative Commons

#CUE19 – A few #DigCit takeaways

Attending a CUE conference is always worth the 9-hour drive from Elk Grove, CA to Palm Springs, CA. Last week’s #CUE19 three-day conference delivered on the promise to provide “dozens of workshops – hundreds of sessions – countless memories” – along with a number of digital citizenship/media literacy takeaways:

Got DigCit? 

As the co-directors of EGUSD’s Digital Citizenship Program, we really value opportunities to learn about ways other districts are weaving #DigCit into the school day, so we were excited to attend Ben Cogswell and Norma Gamez’s session.

If you check out their presentation, you will see that in addition to pulling lessons and resources from Common Sense and other organizations, they even create their own:

They also brought up a good point on the two ways we need to be rolling out digital citizenship – Explicit: Planned Lessons and Emergent: In the Moment:

planned lesson vs. in the moment

We’re looking forward to attending Ben and Norma’s session at Monterey Bay CUE’s May 18 DigCit Summit in Salinas, CA.

Session 5: Thinking Critically about the (Fake) News

It’s always a privilege to join Rob Appel and Kelly Mendoza for a #DigCit/#MediaLiteracy presentation. We were excited to present to a packed room full of educators enthusiastic about gathering new resources for this rapidly changing topic.

Thinking Critically Presentation

Over the past year, we have continued to update and add to our media literacy resources, with the goal of providing tips for helping students (and ourselves) step out of “filter bubbles,” use effective search skills, and become fact-checking pros (and lateral readers).

If you didn’t make it to our session, here’s the link to our session resources. We hope you can join us at the May 18 #DigCit Summit.

Can I Use That? Exploring Copyright, Fair Use, and Creative Commons 

If you were one of our participants, thank you for your great questions and your interest in the topic. We wish this had been a 90-minute session. It’s always a challenge to pack all the information into an hour.

As essential as this topic is to media literacy/digital citizenship programs, we are finding that educators are still not feeling fully confident of their understanding of copyright, their ability to flex their fair use muscles, and their understanding of Creative Commons best practices. It was exciting at the end of our session to have a number of participants ask if they could use our presentation … the following Monday.

In addition to offering our sessions at national conferences, making sure Elk Grove Unified teachers and administrators have options within the district to attend our workshops is a top priority. We will be updating the ERO schedule soon with our next round of workshops and will also post the dates, times, and locations here on the website.

“I think the classroom teacher has a unique opportunity to introduce media literacy concepts and critical thinking questions every time they teach with images, film, video, news, advertising and the Internet.” Frank Baker, Media Literacy Clearinghouse

Teaching About Intellectual Property – #Hyperdoc Style

Can I use that? Hyperdoc

We love the many ways teachers in the district are guiding student-centered conversations about building positive digital footprints, protecting online privacy, and confronting cyberbullying. A shout out to Common Sense Media, iKeepSafe, and Netsmartz for the wealth of free resources and lessons you provide to schools on these key digital citizenship topics.

EGUSD’s 4 digital citizenship themes – BY NC SA

There is a fourth digital citizenship topic that many teachers are increasingly recognizing the need to address: intellectual property. By 5th grade, most students have been warned about the consequences of plagiarism, a conversation that is typically repeated throughout their middle and high school days. While plagiarism is certainly an important topic, in a digital age, copyright,  fair use, and Creative Commons also need to be included in the conversations. Given how easy it has become to download, copy, remix, and upload online content, students need to have an understanding of both their intellectual property rights and responsibilities.

Digital ID Project’s 4 digital citizenship foci – BY NC SA

Digital ID Project’s 4 digital citizenship foci – BY NC SA

As a co-directors of the district’s Digital Citizenship initiative and co-curators of the Digital ID project, we are always seeking teacher-friendly/student-friendly resources on intellectual property. We also facilitate district-wide and national workshops ( e.g., CUE and ISTE) to help teachers understand that copyright is different from plagiarism and that fair use and Creative Commons are also options for our students.

Based on questions from workshop participants, two years ago we created Can I Use That? A Guide for Teaching about Creative Commons. We always review the guide prior to a workshop to check if we need to update any information or add new resources. This year, in preparation for the March CUE Conference, we’re adding a #HyperDocs* lesson that invites students to delve into copyright, flex their fair use muscles, and license their own creations via Creative Commons. So here it is: Can I Use That? Exploring Copyright, Fair Use, and Creative Commons.

If you have questions about the lesson or suggestions for updates to the Guide, please respond with a comment below.

*#HperDocs is a term invented by @LHighfill. Lisa Highfill was our featured keynote speaker for our EGUSD January 28 Digital Kids, Digital Classrooms Saturday Seminar.

Creative Commons Licensing – Part 2

If you enjoyed learning about Creative Commons licensing through Part 1 of Jim Bentley’s student-created video, you will be pleased to know that his 5th graders have just released Part 2: CC Licenses Explained:

Please feel free to share this video – especially with your students. Although there are many videos available on the topic of Creative Commons licenses, we are sure you will agree that the most powerful teaching model is students teaching students. We will be sharing both videos with our EGUSD Digital Citizenship Site Coordinators. It is always our recommendation that when teaching a lesson or unit on copyright and fair use, it’s important to also introduce Creative Commons licensing. For more information on Creative Commons, please refer to Can I Use That? A Guide to Creative Commons, our ever-growing Google doc.

If you have more classroom-appropriate resources on this important topic, please leave a comment.

EGUSD Saturday Seminar Keynote Models #DigCit

rushton1

On Saturday, technology visionary Rushton Hurley blended educational insights, humor and inspiration in his opening keynote for EGUSD’s September Digital Kids, Digital Classrooms event. Rushton shared a number of thought-provoking tips during his Seeing Ourselves presentation:

  • How to avoid C.I.S. (Comparative Inadequacy Syndrome) by reminding yourself “The only person who you need to compare yourself to is the you who you were yesterday.”
  • When students are supported in creating content for an authentic audience, their question changes from “Is this good enough?” to “Is this good?”
  • We need to change our question to students from “What do you want to be?” to “What problem do you want to solve?”

Starting with his opening keynote slide, Rushton also subtly promoted and modeled respect for intellectual property by crediting the image to the photographer.

rushton2

On his second slide, Rushton made it clearer yet that he was respecting the Creative Commons licensing the photographer chose when sharing this photo on Flickr.

rushton3

As long-time fans of Creative Commons, we loved that a nationally/internationally known presenter, from start to finish, promoted the importance of respecting intellectual property through proper attribution.

Following his keynote, Rushton facilitated The Magic of Digital Media for Powerful and Engaging Learning workshop. Once again, he started with modeling respect for intellectual property in his opening slide..

Rushton4

…and his second slide…

Rushton5

…and then moved on to share the power of images via simple teaching tips (EX: start class by projecting a photo and having students team up to generate three possible explanations for the photo – or asking them to explain how the photo connects to yesterday’s lesson).

Besides sharing Search Creative Commons (our favorite way to find CC licensed works), he shared several more options for finding Creative Commons licensed images.

  • PhotoPin – PhotoPin has an layout, with the Creative Commons photos below a line and fee-based photos above (what Rushton referred to a “business model”). PhotoPin also has the option to filter for “Interestingness.”
  • Tackkr – Tackkrs helps you to create presentations in a webpage style rather than slides. Rushton explained there are 3 versions of Tackker, one of which is free and doesn’t require a login. We’re just starting to explore Tackkr. If the free version looks like an easy way for students to find Creative Commons licensed images, we’ll add it to our Can I Use That? A Guide to Creative Commons.
  • Haiku Deck – Haiku Deck helps you build beautiful presentations. You can sign up for the free version – and it comes with Creative Commons licensed images.

We just want to say one more time, how cool is that when your keynote speaker and workshop presenter seamlessly weaves digital citizenship into his sessions?!

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